Theoretical Estimation of Optimal Linear Cooling Rate for PK-15 Cell Suspension

Authors

  • Olga I. Gordienko Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4459-4213
  • Igor F. Kovalenko Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7063-6712
  • Svitlana Ye. Kovalenko Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv
  • Larysa G. Kuleshova Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv
  • Oleksandr F. Todrin Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv

Keywords:

PK-15 cells, two-factor theory of cryoinjury, intracellular crystallization, solution effect, physical and mathematical model

Abstract

Preservation of cells during crystallization of the cell suspension is influenced by two types of damaging factors. The first type of cryoinjury occurs during the crystallization of the extracellular environment and is caused by dehydration of cells, increasing the concentration and ionic strength of extracellular and intracellular solutions. As the cooling rate rises, the damage rate of the first type decreases as a result of the reduced time of action of damaging factors. The second type of cryoinjury is intracellular crystallization, the probability of which enhances at high cooling rates, is considered the most destructive to cells. The optimal linear cooling rate for PK-15 cells is determined using a physico-mathematical model, which describes the probability of cryoinjury of cells in the linear freezing mode and is based on the two-factor theory of cryoinjury, thermodynamic theory of homogeneous crystallization and general theory of activation-type processes. The findings have shown that within the range of cooling rates < 0.5 °C/min the cryoinjury of PK-15 cells occurs mainly due to the effects of the solution, and at cooling rates > 2.5 °C/min this was mainly resulted from an intracellular crystallization. The dependence of the percentage of damaged cells on the cooling rate has a relatively wide minimum within the range of cooling rates of 0.5 °C/min… 2.5 °C/min.

 

Probl Cryobiol Cryomed 2021; 31(3): 214-222

Author Biographies

Olga I. Gordienko, Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv

Department of Low Temperature Preservation

Igor F. Kovalenko, Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv

Department of Low Temperature Preservation

Svitlana Ye. Kovalenko, Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv

Department of Low Temperature Preservation

Larysa G. Kuleshova , Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv

Department of Low Temperature Preservation

Oleksandr F. Todrin , Institute for Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kharkiv

Department of Low Temperature Preservation

References

Chang T, Zhao G. Ice Inhibition for cryopreservation: materials, strategies, and challenges. Adv Sci (Weinh). 2021; 8(6): 2002425.

Fahy GM, Wowk B. Principles of ice-free cryopreservation by vitrification. Methods Mol Biol. 2021; 2180: 27–97.

Gordiyenko YeО, Gordiyenko OI, Maruschenko VV, et al. An improved model of passive mass transfer across the plasma membrane of the cell. Biophys Bull. 2008; 21(2): 75– 80.

Gordiyenko OI, Kovalenko SYe, Kovalenko IF, et al. Theoretical estimation of the optimum cooling rate of a cell suspension at linear freezing modes based on a two factor theory of cryodamage. CryoLetters. 2018; 39(6): 380–5.

Hunt CJ. Cryopreservation: vitrification and controlled rate cooling. Methods Mol Biol. 2017; 1590: 41–77.

Landau LD, Lifshitz EM [Statistical physics]. Moskow: Nauka; 1976. 584с. Russian.

Li R. , Yu G., Azarin SM, Hubel A. Freezing responses in DMSO-based cryopreservation of human iPS cells: aggregates versus single cells. Tissue Eng Part C Methods. 2018; 24(5):289–99.

Mazur P. Theoretical and experimental effects of cooling and warming velocity on the survival of frozen and thawed cells. Cryobiology. 1966; 2: 181–92.

Mazur P. The role of intracellular freezing in the death of cells at supraoptimal rates. Cryobiology. 1977; 14(2): 251–72.

Mazur P. Freezing of living cells: mechanisms and implications. Am J Cell Physiol. 1984; 247(3): 125–42.

Mazur P, Leibo SP, Chee EHY. A two factors hypothesis of freezing injury. Cell Res. 1972; 71: 345–85.

Moussa M, Dumont F, Ferrier-Cornet JM. Cell inactivation and membrane damage after long-term treatments at sub-zero temperature in the supercooled and frozen states. Biotechnol Bioeng. 2008; 101(6): 1245–55.

Pegg DE. Principles of cryopreservation. Methods Mol Biol. 2015; 1257: 3–19.

Poisson JS, Acker JP, Briard JG, et al. Modulating intracellular ice growth with cell-permeating small-molecule ice recrystallization inhibitors Langmuir. 2019; 35(23): 7452–58.

Todrin AF, Popivnenko LI, Kovalenko SYe. Therm physical properties of cryoprotectants. I. Temperature and heat of melting. Problems of Cryobiology. 2009; 19(2): 163–76.

Wesley-Smith J, Walters C, Pammenter NW, Berjak P. Why is intracellular ice lethal? A microscopical study showing evidence of programmed cell death in cryo-exposed embryonic axes of recalcitrant seeds of Acer saccharinum. Ann Bot. 2015; 115(6): 991–1000.

William N, Acker JP. Transient loss of membrane integrity following intracellular ice formation in dimethyl sulfoxidetreated hepatocyte and endothelial cell monolayers. Cryobiology. 2020; 97: 217–21.

Yu G, Yap YR, Pollock K, Hubel A. Characterizing intracellular ice formation of lymphoblasts using low-temperature Raman Spectroscopy. Biophys J. 2017; 112(12): 2653–63

Downloads

Published

2021-10-08

How to Cite

Gordienko, O., Kovalenko, I., Kovalenko, S., Larysa G. Kuleshova , L. G. K. ., & Todrin , O. (2021). Theoretical Estimation of Optimal Linear Cooling Rate for PK-15 Cell Suspension . Problems of Cryobiology and Cryomedicine, 31(3), 214–222. Retrieved from http://cryo.org.ua/journal/index.php/probl-cryobiol-cryomed/article/view/1740

Issue

Section

Theoretical and Experimental Cryobiology